Colgate Colgate Oral and Dental Health Resource Center

Innovative toothpastes to clean and brighten every type of smile.

Toothpastes

A toothbrush for every type of smile, designed with comfort and results in mind.

Toothbrushes

Colgate kids' products make brushing fun and encourage routine use.

Kids' Products

Oral care products available exclusively through dental professionals.

Products From the Dentist

Professional grade oral care, available without a prescription.

Other Oral Care

Every smile is unique and requires a different type of care. Colgate has a solution for every smile.

Search by Benefit
Font size

Case studies compare soda’s effect on tooth enamel to erosion by drugs

Can't seem to lay off the soda? A new case study report compares tooth damage from abuse of soda to damage from abuse of some illicit drugs.

Overconsumption of acidic carbonated beverages, especially soda, can erode tooth enamel in a manner similar to the abuse of illicit drugs, such as methamphetamine, posits "Dental Erosion Due to Abuse of Illicit Drugs and Acidic Carbonated Beverages," a case study reported in the March/April issue of General Dentistry. The Academy of General Dentistry publishes General Dentistry.

The case study notes that tooth erosion from soda occurs when acid wears away tooth enamel, which is the glossy, protective outside layer of the tooth.

Dr. Mohamed A. Bassiouny, a dentist who was the lead author of the case study, compared damage in the mouths of three individuals. One was a methamphetamine user, one a cocaine user and one an excessive soda consumer. Each participant reported poor oral hygiene and irregular dental visits. The researchers noted that the participants each had the same type and severity of tooth erosion damage.

"Each person experienced severe tooth erosion caused by the high acid levels present in their 'drug' of choice—meth, crack or soda," said Dr. Mohamed. "The citric acid present in both regular and diet soda is known to have a high potential for causing tooth erosion."

The soda abuser reported drinking 2 liters of diet soda each day for three to five years, according to the case study, and hadn't sought dental treatment for two decades.

"The striking similarities found in this study should be a wakeup call to consumers who think that soda—even diet soda—is not harmful to their oral health," Dr. Bassiouny said.

The American Dental Association has resources that explain how nutrition affects oral health on its consumer website MouthHealthy.org.

©2010 American Dental Association. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission from the American Dental Association.

06/19/2013

ColgatePalmolive.com  |  Colgate.com  |  Legal/Privacy  |  Colgate.com Site Map  |  Contact Us
© Colgate-Palmolive Company. All rights reserved.
You are viewing the United States site.