Skip to main content

Articles

Articles

View Articles By Age:

Sucking is a natural reflex for babies. They start to develop and practice it even before they are born. Sucking is a normal part of development that is comforting to children well into their first years of life. Read More

Soon after an infant is born, a doctor or nurse practitioner thoroughly examines his or her body, including the mouth. Most of the time a baby's gums, tongue and soft palate are normally developed and ready for action. But sometimes there are harmless variations that may surprise some parents. Read More

Do you see a white bud that could be your baby's first tooth? Between four and six months of age, your little angel will begin teething. This is an exciting milestone, but sometimes it can turn your little one's smile upside down, as erupting teeth can be uncomfortable. This rite of passage is a time to collect tips on teething and begin thinking about your child's dental care. Read More

Passing on good oral habits to your child is one of the most important health lessons you can teach them. This means helping him or her brush twice a day, showing the proper way to floss, limiting between-meal snacks and seeing your dentist regularly. Read More

It's an exciting milestone for parents when their child begins cutting teeth, but it can also be distressing to realize that your baby is beginning a period of irritability and discomfort that you cannot prevent or cure. There are, however, some symptoms you can recognize and methods to relieve the discomfort of the teething process for your child. There are other symptoms that might appear during this time that may seem to be related to teething but are actually indicative of another issue. Read on to learn the difference. Read More

What teething remedies are safe for babies? It is not easy watching your child deal with the discomfort that can come with the arrival of baby's first teeth. When primary teeth begin to erupt around six months of age, a little one's gums can become sore and tender. A teething baby may become irritable and fussy. He may try to suck or chew on anything he can find for relief. You can ease your baby's discomfort with simple, safe remedies. Read More

Sometimes called Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, Early Childhood Cavities is a serious disease that can destroy your child's teeth – but it can be prevented. Read More

When your child begins to get his first baby teeth, it's natural, as a parent, to start thinking about the best way to care for them so he can have healthy teeth and gums as he gets older. However, children have special needs that make caring for their teeth different from how you care for your own. Read More

Parents are often unsure about when to take a child to a dentist. Should you wait until all of his teeth have come in, or perhaps until there is a real problem? The experts say no. The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend that a child's first visit should be when the first tooth erupts in the mouth, no later than age one to two. Read More

When the first teeth begin to erupt in your child's mouth, you might feel concerned about giving her the right dental care and ensuring that her teeth remain white, clean and cavity-free. Proper dental care for kids involves more than just brushing your child's teeth every day. It involves knowing the right overall dental hygiene, so that you can teach your child how to care for her own teeth throughout her lifetime. Read More

Protecting your child's teeth from decay is important, but it can often be a struggle to get a child to clean his teeth or have his teeth cleaned every day. A reward system can help get the job done without tears or tantrums. Read More

When infants are born, almost all of their primary (baby) teeth already have formed. These teeth are still hidden in the gums. They usually begin to erupt or cut through the gums at about 6 months of age. Some babies get teeth earlier, and some get them later. That's OK. Your 1-year-old may have a different number of teeth than your neighbor's 1-year-old. Read More

Teaching your child proper oral care at a young age is an investment in his or her health that will pay lifelong dividends. You can start by setting an example; taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued. Read More

The day your child is old enough to go to his first dentist appointment is a landmark occasion, but it can also be stressful and scary for your little one. He might have heard stories from other children or siblings that scare him; this can make it difficult for him to relax and may even lead to tears or a tantrum. Read More

Although brushing is the focal point of your child's daily dental routine, flossing is just as important. Flossing helps to remove the food particles and plaque that build up between the teeth and gumline that a toothbrush typically can't reach. Read More

Hey Moms and Dads, is it time to teach your kids how to brush? Taking the time to teach your children to clean their own teeth at an early age will pay off in the long run. Learning to brush teeth is an essential skill for your toddler's long-term dental health. Read More

When infants are born, almost all of their primary (baby) teeth already have formed. These teeth are still hidden in the gums. They usually begin to erupt or cut through the gums at about 6 months of age. Some babies get teeth earlier, and some get them later. That's OK. Your 1-year-old may have a different number of teeth than your neighbor's 1-year-old. Read More

Losing a tooth can be an exciting event for a child. The anticipation of a visit from the tooth fairy, and the rewards she leaves can add to that excitement. Rather than let the visit be all about the money, you can use tooth fairy letters to encourage your child to take great care of his teeth, and answer questions most kids have about the tooth fairy at the same time. Read More

The tooth fairy myth takes on different forms and involves different stories in each household. Some families maintain that there are many tooth fairies, while in others the fairy is actually a mouse. Some believe tooth fairies look like Tinkerbell, while others imagine tooth fairies as male. Read More

There is no standard timetable for when your child's mouth should be X-rayed. The need varies with the child's development and dental health. If your child has had many cavities and fillings or has a high risk of tooth decay, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends X-rays every six months. Read More

Your child's permanent teeth start to come in around the age of 6. Do you know how to protect them from cavities? Daily brushing and flossing and dental check-ups every six months are the foundation of good oral hygiene for kids, but there is more that you can do to prevent tooth decay. Read More

Help your kids have a healthy smile by making dental hygiene for kids fun. Making brushing, flossing and dental check-ups a positive experience can help to keep your child excited about good oral care. You child will not only grow up with a beautiful smile, but also with healthy habits that can last a lifetime. Read More

Since your children's health is always high on your list of priorities, maintaining a healthy smile should be, too. Encouraging habits that will lead to healthy teeth for kids will aid them greatly in the future. Read More

Teenagers can be tough on their teeth. They may be so busy with school, jobs, sports and social activities that they don't find time to brush. They also tend to eat a lot of junk food. Combine the two and you've got a situation ripe for tooth decay. Not surprisingly, many teenagers develop a lot of cavities. Read More

There are many things that you and your dentist can do to help your children have strong, healthy teeth; one of those things is using dental sealant for children. Read More

Does the thought of getting your kids braces bring back painful "metal mouth" memories of your own? There was the teasing, the food stuck in your brackets for days on end, and the painful adjustments every few weeks. Read More

It's called "pop" in the Midwest and most of Canada. It's "soda" in the Northeast. And it goes by a well-known brand name in much of the South. Read More

View Articles By Subject:

Soon after an infant is born, a doctor or nurse practitioner thoroughly examines his or her body, including the mouth. Most of the time a baby's gums, tongue and soft palate are normally developed and ready for action. But sometimes there are harmless variations that may surprise some parents.  Read More

Passing on good oral habits to your child is one of the most important health lessons you can teach them. This means helping him or her brush twice a day, showing the proper way to floss, limiting between-meal snacks and seeing your dentist regularly.  Read More

When infants are born, almost all of their primary (baby) teeth already have formed. These teeth are still hidden in the gums. They usually begin to erupt or cut through the gums at about 6 months of age. Some babies get teeth earlier, and some get them later. That's OK. Your 1-year-old may have a different number of teeth than your neighbor's 1-year-old. Read More

Teaching your child proper oral care at a young age is an investment in his or her health that will pay lifelong dividends. You can start by setting an example; taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued. Read More

Help your kids have a healthy smile by making dental hygiene for kids fun. Making brushing, flossing and dental check-ups a positive experience can help to keep your child excited about good oral care. You child will not only grow up with a beautiful smile, but also with healthy habits that can last a lifetime. Read More

Teenagers can be tough on their teeth. They may be so busy with school, jobs, sports and social activities that they don't find time to brush. They also tend to eat a lot of junk food. Combine the two and you've got a situation ripe for tooth decay. Not surprisingly, many teenagers develop a lot of cavities. Read More

When your child begins to get his first baby teeth, it's natural, as a parent, to start thinking about the best way to care for them so he can have healthy teeth and gums as he gets older. However, children have special needs that make caring for their teeth different from how you care for your own.  Read More

Although brushing is the focal point of your child's daily dental routine, flossing is just as important. Flossing helps to remove the food particles and plaque that build up between the teeth and gumline that a toothbrush typically can't reach. Read More

Help your kids have a healthy smile by making dental hygiene for kids fun. Making brushing, flossing and dental check-ups a positive experience can help to keep your child excited about good oral care. You child will not only grow up with a beautiful smile, but also with healthy habits that can last a lifetime. Read More

Hey Moms and Dads, is it time to teach your kids how to brush? Taking the time to teach your children to clean their own teeth at an early age will pay off in the long run. Learning to brush teeth is an essential skill for your toddler's long-term dental health.  Read More

Sometimes called Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, Early Childhood Cavities is a serious disease that can destroy your child's teeth – but it can be prevented. Read More

When infants are born, almost all of their primary (baby) teeth already have formed. These teeth are still hidden in the gums. They usually begin to erupt or cut through the gums at about 6 months of age.  Read More

Your child's permanent teeth start to come in around the age of 6. Do you know how to protect them from cavities? Daily brushing and flossing and dental check-ups every six months are the foundation of good oral hygiene for kids, but there is more that you can do to prevent tooth decay.  Read More

It's called "pop" in the Midwest and most of Canada. It's "soda" in the Northeast. And it goes by a well-known brand name in much of the South. Read More

Losing a tooth is one of the great rites of passage during childhood, one that involves the magical transformation of their tooth into money or a small gift. The traditional idea of the tooth fairy involves the child placing his tooth under the pillow at night and awakening the next morning to find that the tooth fairy has left money in its place.  Read More

Losing a tooth can be an exciting event for a child. The anticipation of a visit from the tooth fairy, and the rewards she leaves can add to that excitement. Rather than let the visit be all about the money, you can use tooth fairy letters to encourage your child to take great care of his teeth, and answer questions most kids have about the tooth fairy at the same time.  Read More

The tooth fairy myth takes on different forms and involves different stories in each household. Some families maintain that there are many tooth fairies, while in others the fairy is actually a mouse. Some believe tooth fairies look like Tinkerbell, while others imagine tooth fairies as male. Read More

Soon after an infant is born, a doctor or nurse practitioner thoroughly examines his or her body, including the mouth. Most of the time a baby's gums, tongue and soft palate are normally developed and ready for action. But sometimes there are harmless variations that may surprise some parents.  Read More

Sucking is a natural reflex for babies. They start to develop and practice it even before they are born. Sucking is a normal part of development that is comforting to children well into their first years of life. Read More

Passing on good oral habits to your child is one of the most important health lessons you can teach them. This means helping him or her brush twice a day, showing the proper way to floss, limiting between-meal snacks and seeing your dentist regularly.  Read More

Do you see a white bud that could be your baby's first tooth? Between four and six months of age, your little angel will begin teething. This is an exciting milestone, but sometimes it can turn your little one's smile upside down, as erupting teeth can be uncomfortable.  Read More

t's an exciting milestone for parents when their child begins cutting teeth, but it can also be distressing to realize that your baby is beginning a period of irritability and discomfort that you cannot prevent or cure. There are, however, some symptoms you can recognize and methods to relieve the discomfort of the teething process for your child.  Read More

What teething remedies are safe for babies? It is not easy watching your child deal with the discomfort that can come with the arrival of baby's first teeth. When primary teeth begin to erupt around six months of age, a little one's gums can become sore and tender. A teething baby may become irritable and fussy. He may try to suck or chew on anything he can find for relief. You can ease your baby's discomfort with simple, safe remedies. Read More

New parents often ask, "When should my child first see a dentist?" The short answer is "First visit by first birthday." That's the view of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Pediatricians agree. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children who are at risk of early childhood cavities visit a pediatric dentist by age 1.  Read More

Parents are often unsure about when to take a child to a dentist. Should you wait until all of his teeth have come in, or perhaps until there is a real problem? The experts say no. The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend that a child's first visit should be when the first tooth erupts in the mouth, no later than age one to two. Read More

The day your child is old enough to go to his first dentist appointment is a landmark occasion, but it can also be stressful and scary for your little one. He might have heard stories from other children or siblings that scare him; this can make it difficult for him to relax and may even lead to tears or a tantrum.  Read More

There are many things that you and your dentist can do to help your children have strong, healthy teeth; one of those things is using dental sealant for children. Read More

There is no standard timetable for when your child's mouth should be X-rayed. The need varies with the child's development and dental health. If your child has had many cavities and fillings or has a high risk of tooth decay, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends X-rays every six months. Read More

Does the thought of getting your kids braces bring back painful "metal mouth" memories of your own? There was the teasing, the food stuck in your brackets for days on end, and the painful adjustments every few weeks. Read More