Your Dental Crown Procedure: What To Expect

girls after getting dental crowns

Your dentist may recommend that you undergo a dental crown procedure for one of several reasons: you have a particularly weak tooth that needs to be held together, you had root canal treatment; you have a tooth that is extremely discoloured; or you wish to have a tooth crown placed for cosmetic reasons.

There are several types of crowns that can be used, including ceramic, porcelain, resin, and stainless steel (cosmetic crowns are usually made of porcelain or ceramic). You should have your dentist address your specific situation and make a recommendation on which is best for your tooth, as each one has been reported to have its own pros and cons.

The procedure for installing a dental crown normally takes two separate dentist visits. At your first appointment, your dentist will examine the tooth to make sure that it can support a crown, then begin filing it down to prepare for the crown. Alternatively, if the tooth is severely damaged or broken, your dentist may need to fill it in to make it large enough to properly receive the crown.

Once the tooth is filed or filled to the proper shape, your practitioner will take an impression of the tooth, as well as those surrounding it, and send it away to a dental lab, so the permanent crown can be made accordingly. By the end of this first visit, your tooth will have a new temporary crown that protects it until the final tooth crown is ready to be permanently placed.

When the permanent crown is ready, you will have your second visit. At this appointment, the temporary crown is removed, after which the dentist will position and fasten the new crown to the tooth with a special adhesive.

Once your dental crown procedure is complete, it may take some getting used to before the permanent crown feels normal in your mouth; however, after a little time has passed, the crown should look, function, and feel like a regular tooth. If you have any questions about your crown after your procedure, be sure to talk to your dentist.

This article is intended to promote understanding of and knowledge about general oral health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment.

More Articles You May Like

Stop plaque in its tracks

Plaque is a sticky bacteria that sticks to your teeth. When plaque is not removed through brushing and flossing, it turns into tartar. Try one of our toothpastes which reduces plaque and tartar build up.