What Age Do Babies Start Teething?

baby playing with toothbrush

As a parent, you become familiar with every one of your child's cries. One day, when your baby starts teething, there will be a new one: a cry that signals that your baby is growing his or her first tooth. Before that new cry comes, here is some information all parents should know about when babies start to grow their first teeth and what they can do to alleviate their teething pain.

At What Age Do Babies Start Teething?

So, when do babies start teething? A baby's first tooth typically appears anywhere from 3 months of age to a year of age. The last teeth to grow in are usually the molar, or back teeth, which often start making an appearance anywhere from 13 months all the way up to 33 months.

When a tooth starts to break through the gum line, the process will naturally cause your little one some discomfort. When babies start teething, symptoms include tender gums, drooling, irritability, trouble sleeping and gnawing and biting on toys. All of this is completely natural. Many of these symptoms will occur throughout the teething process, and every new tooth will take from a couple of days to a few weeks to completely break through.

How to Alleviate Teething Discomfort

While babies start teething at different ages, there's one thing they all have in common. Teething often leads to some discomfort and babies need your help to ease their pain. Rubbing the gums with a clean finger, or even a moist gauze square, will help to alleviate symptoms. A teething ring, which can be frozen, is another way to make your child's teething process more comfortable.

Taking Care of Baby Teeth

Even before babies are done teething, be sure to keep every new tooth clean in order to avoid any tooth decay from baby foods and milk. While the teeth will naturally fall out in a few years, pediatricians recommend using a washcloth to wipe a baby's teeth after feeding time. It's advisable to brush your baby's teeth with a children's toothbrush and water. You can add a drop ( we say smear or pea sized amount) of fluoride toothpaste to the cleaning process after two years of age.

If you have further questions about when babies start teething or concerns about your baby's teething, be sure to speak to a pediatrician or dentist.

For more information on teething, visit the Colgate Oral Care Centre.

https://www.colgate.com/en-za/oral-health/life-stages/infant-oral-care/top-teething-symptoms-0213

This article is intended to promote understanding of and knowledge about general oral health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment.

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