Buck Teeth? Three Ways to Minimize Them Without Braces

Buck teeth (which the American Dental Association clinically refers to as malocclusion) aren't anything to be ashamed of, but they can still make you feel self-conscious. When your front teeth are misaligned and protrude in a way that brings unwanted attention to your smile, you might find yourself covering up your mouth or skipping a smile altogether. Typically, malocclusion is fixed via braces, but if braces aren't an option for you, you can still minimize the look of your prominent front teeth. Find your confident smile with these tips.

1. Practice Good Oral Hygiene

Having protruding front teeth or malocclusion can make you feel self-conscious enough, so don't bring more unwanted attention to your teeth. Poor oral hygiene and allowing your teeth to become obviously yellowed, decayed or damaged is a bad look. Instead, brush twice daily with a whitening toothpaste like Colgate Total® Advanced Whitening to keep your teeth bright and healthy. Confidence in your smile starts with healthy teeth, so follow a daily routine so that even prominent teeth look great.

2. Direct Attention

If you aren't happy with your smile because of your teeth, direct others' attention to some of the features that you love. Do you have great eyes? You can use cosmetics to highlight the color and shape. Or, maybe you love the way your hair looks. Make sure that it's coiffed and neat. Love your cheekbones? Use a bronzer for contouring and to direct attention to those features you do love to help boost your confidence.

Alternately, if you do feel self-conscious about your smile, you may want to skip brightly colored or glossy lip products, which will definitely pull focus to your mouth.

3. Smile Confidently

Sometimes, the very actions you use to cover up your buck teeth might be simply drawing more attention to them. If you're constantly covering your mouth with your hand or avoiding smiling altogether, it might be sending a signal to look at the very area that makes you uncomfortable. One of the best solutions isn't to hide your smile, but to embrace your unique look. When you show that your teeth alignment doesn't bother you, you're sending a message of confidence to others. It's likely that they'll stop noticing your teeth and focus on your smile instead.

If your teeth bother you, make sure that you talk to your doctor or visit an orthodontist for a consultation. Even if you've been told that braces aren't a good fit (personally or financially), there are other options available to those seeking more confidence in their smile. The U.S. National Library of Medicine suggests fixes such as orthodontic appliances, tooth removal and surgery may help you achieve the straight smile you seek.

Whether you feel like your buck teeth are an asset or something that makes you uncomfortable, remember that confidence is key. By highlighting some of your best assets and keeping your teeth clean and bright, all people will remember is your great smile.

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Common Conditions During ADULTHOOD

As we get older, dental care for adults is crucial. Here are a few of the conditions to be aware of:

Gum disease – if your home care routine of brushing and flossing has slipped and you have skipped your regular dental cleanings, bacterial plaque and tartar can build up on your teeth. The plaque and tartar, if left untreated, may eventually cause irreparable damage to your jawbone and support structures, and could lead to tooth loss.

Oral cancer – according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, men over the age of 40 have the greatest risk for oral cancer. About approximately 43,000 people will be diagnosed with cancer of the mouth, tongue or throat area, and the ACS estimates that about 7,000 people will die from these cancers. The use of tobacco products and alcohol increases the risk of oral cancer. Most oral cancers are first diagnosed by the dentist during a routine checkup.

Dental fillings break down – fillings have a life expectancy of eight to 10 years. However, they can last 20 years or longer. When the fillings in your mouth start to break down, food and bacteria can get underneath them and can cause decay deep in the tooth.