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Six Myths About Oral Health And Overall Health

You've probably heard the phrase, "at least you have your health." Maybe you've uttered it yourself. It's usually said in an effort to make the best out of a less-desirable situation, though there's some truth behind it. Serious conditions such as heart disease, cancer, ALS, Type II diabetes and mental illness usually grab headlines in the healthcare field. But many people don't realize the connection between oral health and overall health.

The mouth serves as a window into a person's health, but there tends to be a lot of confusion about how mouth care affects our well-being. Let's bust some myths about your oral health:

'Tooth Decay Is Mainly Caused by Sugar.'

Not so, according to Dr. Gerry Curatola of Rejuvenation Dentistry in New York City. Sugar certainly plays a role in tooth decay but it isn't the main perpetrator. Acids from naturally occurring bacteria in the mouth combine with saliva, resulting in plaque buildup on teeth. Often this happens during the consumption of carbohydrates.

'Fillings Made of Silver Aren't a Health Risk.'

Fifty-two percent of silver fillings are made of mercury, according to Curatola, and over time, this mercury can leech out into the mouth. Mercury has been linked to a few autoimmune and chronic diseases, and fillings containing this element should therefore be replaced in a timely manner, if not avoided altogether. People with silver fillings who grind their teeth, drink a lot of hot or carbonated beverages and chew a lot of gum may be particularly prone to this effect.

'Gum Disease Isn't Very Common.'

Gum disease is all too common. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that 47 percent of adults age 30 and older have some form of gum disease. And as we age, we're naturally more susceptible to infections, including those in the gums. Sixty-four percent of adults age 65 and older have either moderate or severe gum disease.

'Bad Breath Is a Sign of Gum Disease.'

Although bad breath indicates you might have gum disease, it's also a sign of other potential health issues. The only sure way to know is by making an appointment with your dentist. If he or she gives your mouth a clean bill of health, consult your primary care physician. Bad breath can also be a symptom of acid reflux, a bowel obstruction or some other digestive issue, often nicknamed "stomach breath," according to Thomas P. Connelly, D.D.S.

'Diabetes Means You'll Get Gum Disease.'

Diabetes, a condition many people deal with on a daily basis, affects the processing of sugar in the human body and can lead to issues with the heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves. Poorly regulated blood sugar makes it hard to curb common issues like gum disease, but it doesn't cause an infection of the gums. Those who have diabetes need to be meticulous when taking care of their teeth, so they can remain as healthy as anyone else.

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