Ketosis Breath: When Your Diet Affects Your Oral Health

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The ketogenic diet has created buzz in the health community and for good reason. Many have found success in restricting their carb intake so that the body burns fat instead of glucose to lose weight. If you're following a keto diet, you might notice some unpleasant side effects that accompany the positive changes on the scale. For example, so-called ketosis breath is a common complaint. Understanding keto breath is the first step to ensuring your diet doesn't impair your oral health.

Ketosis and Your Breath

If a lower-carb lifestyle is supposedly healthy, then why does it result in foul-smelling breath? The answer is in how your body breaks down fats. After swapping a typical carb-heavy diet for one that promotes fats and protein, your body goes into ketosis. As the University of California, San Francisco explains, ketosis is a process wherein your body begins to burn fat for energy, since glucose stores (your body's preferred source of energy) aren't readily available. While in ketosis, your body converts fat cells into three types of ketones, which are fat byproducts. One of these ketones, called acetone, is essentially unusable for your body's energy stores. Therefore, your body releases it via your urine and lungs, notes Medscape. It's acetone that gives your breath that distinctive "ketosis" smell, which, according to Medline Plus, can be compared to an overly sweet, fruity scent.

Keto Diet and Oral Health

When swapping carbs for healthy fats and proteins, your body undergoes several changes. While ketosis breath is often associated with a low-carb lifestyle, the diet may also have a positive effect on your oral health. After all, in avoiding carbs, you're also avoiding processed sugars, which the American Dental Association counts among the worst foods for oral health. Because oral bacteria thrive on sugar, reducing your sugar intake may reduce cavities.

A low-carb diet may also help reduce inflammation. A study in BMC Oral Health found that a diet low in carbohydrates and high in omega-3 fatty acids resulted in lower rates of gingivitis and inflammation in patients. So while going low-carb may make your breath smell, it may actually help improve your overall oral health.

Freshening Up

If you've noticed that you have keto breath and you still want to continue your keto diet, consider some of these methods to deal with the smell:

  • Chew sugar-free gum to help stimulate saliva and freshen your breath.
  • Adjust your intake of complex carbohydrates, such as leafy green vegetables and whole grains, while continuing to avoid refined carbs.
  • Fill a water bottle and sip throughout the day.
  • Continue good oral health habits. A keto lifestyle, while beneficial for oral health, is not a substitute for daily brushing and flossing.
  • Add fresh herbs to water and tea. Herbs such as clove, cinnamon, mint and fennel are natural breath fresheners.

Starting and continuing a ketogenic lifestyle should only ever be done with the supervision and approval of a qualified health care professional. While it's true that a keto diet may offer benefits for oral health, it has a few drawbacks as well. By addressing some of the roadblocks, you can make sure that your keto diet is as healthy as it is successful. To keep you on track, lessen the smelly side effects by brushing with Colgate Total Fresh Mint Stripe Gel toothpaste. It has a minty blend of gel and paste that leaves your mouth clean and fresh.

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Common Conditions During ADULTHOOD

As we get older, dental care for adults is crucial. Here are a few of the conditions to be aware of:

Gum disease – if your home care routine of brushing and flossing has slipped and you have skipped your regular dental cleanings, bacterial plaque and tartar can build up on your teeth. The plaque and tartar, if left untreated, may eventually cause irreparable damage to your jawbone and support structures, and could lead to tooth loss.

Oral cancer – according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, men over the age of 40 have the greatest risk for oral cancer. About approximately 43,000 people will be diagnosed with cancer of the mouth, tongue or throat area, and the ACS estimates that about 7,000 people will die from these cancers. The use of tobacco products and alcohol increases the risk of oral cancer. Most oral cancers are first diagnosed by the dentist during a routine checkup.

Dental fillings break down – fillings have a life expectancy of eight to 10 years. However, they can last 20 years or longer. When the fillings in your mouth start to break down, food and bacteria can get underneath them and can cause decay deep in the tooth.